Verapamil Er 240 Mg Tablet

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royce mitchell Says:


Can this tablet be split in half for 2 120 Mg doses?



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royce mitchell Says:

I'm discussing Verapamil 240 er.

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Verwon Says:

No, the ER stands for Extended release, so breaking or cutting the tablet is not safe to do, because it could result in your getting too much of the medication at once. ER tablets are designed to slowly release the medication throughout the day, so there is really no need to break them in half and split the dosage.

If you feel that it isn't working for the length of time it should and feel that you need to split up the dosage, then you should speak to your doctor about getting a prescription for the regular release tablets.


Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker that is most commonly used to help lower high blood pressure.

Common side effects may include: nausea, drowsiness, headache and stomach pain.

Learn more:

https:/­/­www.medschat.com/­wiki/­Verapamil/­

Are there any questions or comments?

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Linda Says:

My mom was on verapamil 360 for about a year. This Jan 13 while at her MD, he found her heart rate a bit rapid. He gave her another prescription of verapamil 240 time released to slow it down. Her MD said to take both. On Jan 27 I had to call 911 for her. Her heart rate was only 22. She had complained about severe stomach pains while on the 2nd pill. I brought her to her MD 3 times in the last week of her life, he said it was consipation. I do believe that this is what killed my mom

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Verwon Says:

Linda, I am very sorry to read of your loss and I hope you and your family are doing well.

I can't say what caused her death, but I understand your concern about the medication and they may be valid, though I also cannot say that with any certainty.

However, the issue that I see of concern is that due to its effects on the heart, Verapamil is a medication that should be titrated up, whenever it is necessary to raise the dosage. This is usually done by starting with the 180mg dosage, then going to 240, if the desired response isn't achieved.

It also isn't recommended that a dose greater than 480mgs be used in a day. If she was taking 360 and 240, that's 500mgs and it could have been too much for her.

I, myself, am not a doctor, but from overdosage and toxicity information that I am reading over on Verapamil, the symptoms she was suffering, such as the low heart rate, abdominal pain and constipation are known symptoms of that.

https:/­/­www.medschat.com/­wiki/­Verapamil/­

Proving any of this, of course, after her death is probably not realistic, but maybe this information can help you understand what might have happened.

Are there any other questions?

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