Adrenergic S

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 Vasoxyl Methoxamine

Methoxamine is an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist,[1] somewhat similar in structure to butaxamine and 2,5-DMA. It is no longer marketed.[why?]. See also Sertraline Phenylephrine Synephrine References ^ Pazdernik, Thomas L.; Kerecsen, Laszlo (2007) [2003]. "5". In Goljan, Edward F. Pharmacology (Paperback)|format= requires |url= (help). Rapid Review (Second ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Mosby-Elsevier. p.39. ISBN978-0-323-04550-6..mw-pars...
 Genasal Oxymetazoline

Oxymetazoline is a selective α1 adrenergic receptor agonist and α2 adrenergic receptor partial agonist. It is a topical decongestant, used in the form of oxymetazoline hydrochloride. It was developed from xylometazoline at E. Merck Darmstadt by Fruhstorfer in 1961.[1] Oxymetazoline is generally available as a nasal spray. Contents 1 Medical uses 2 Side effects and special considerations 2.1 Rebound congestion 2.2 Use in pregnancy 3 Overdose 4 Pharmacology 4.1...
 Ryna-12 S Phenylephrine + Pyrilamine

Phenylephrine is a selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist of the phenethylamine class used primarily as a decongestant, as an agent to dilate the pupil, to increase blood pressure, and to relieve hemorrhoids. Phenylephrine is marketed as an alternative for the decongestant pseudoephedrine, although clinical trials show phenylephrine, taken orally at the recommended dose, to be no more effective than placebo for allergy relief.[1][2] Phenylephrine can als...
 Vasomax Phentolamine

Phentolamine (Regitine) is a reversible[1] nonselective α-adrenergic antagonist.[2] Contents 1 Mechanism 2 Uses 3 Chemistry 4 Adverse effects 5 References Mechanism Its primary action is vasodilation due to α1 blockade.[3] Non-selective α-blockers can cause a much more pronounced reflex tachycardia than the selective α1 blockers. Like the selective α1 blockers, phentolamine causes a relaxation of systemic vascul...
 Vasocon Naphazoline

Naphazoline (in the hydrochloride form) is the common name for 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride. It is a sympathomimetic agent with marked alpha adrenergic activity. It is a vasoconstrictor with a rapid action in reducing swelling when applied to mucous membrane. It acts on alpha-receptors in the arterioles of the conjunctiva to produce constriction, resulting in decreased congestion. It is an active ingredient in several over-the-counter formulations including Eucool, Clear ...
 Esmolol

Esmolol (trade name Brevibloc) is a cardioselective beta1 receptor blocker with rapid onset,[1] a very short duration of action, and no significant intrinsic sympathomimetic or membrane stabilising activity at therapeutic dosages. It is a class II antiarrhythmic.[2] Esmolol decreases the force and rate of heart contractions by blocking beta-adrenergic receptors of the sympathetic nervous system, which are found in the heart and other organs of the body. Esmolo...
 Sotalol

Sotalol is a medication used to treat abnormal heart rhythms. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises that sotalol only be used for serious abnormal heart rhythms, because its prolongation of the QT interval carries a small risk of life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia known as torsade de pointes.[2] Sotalol is a non-selective competitive beta-adrenergic receptor blocker that also exhibits Class III antiarrhythmic properties.[3]&#...
 Serevent Salmeterol

Salmeterol is a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist (LABA) used in the maintenance and prevention of asthma symptoms and maintenance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms.[1] Symptoms of bronchospasm include shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. It is also used to prevent breathing difficulties during exercise (exercise-induced bronchoconstriction).[2] It is marketed as Serevent in the US.[3]...
 Vasosulf Phenylephrine + Sulfacetamide

Phenylephrine is a selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist of the phenethylamine class used primarily as a decongestant, as an agent to dilate the pupil, to increase blood pressure, and to relieve hemorrhoids. Phenylephrine is marketed as an alternative for the decongestant pseudoephedrine, although clinical trials show phenylephrine, taken orally at the recommended dose, to be no more effective than placebo for allergy relief.[1][2] Phenylephrine can als...
 Visine L.R. Oxymetazoline

Oxymetazoline is a selective α1 adrenergic receptor agonist and α2 adrenergic receptor partial agonist. It is a topical decongestant, used in the form of oxymetazoline hydrochloride. It was developed from xylometazoline at E. Merck Darmstadt by Fruhstorfer in 1961.[1] Oxymetazoline is generally available as a nasal spray. Contents 1 Medical uses 2 Side effects and special considerations 2.1 Rebound congestion 2.2 Use in pregnancy 3 Overdose 4 Pharmacology 4.1...
 Rynatuss Carbetapentane + Chlorpheniramine + Ephedrine + Phenylephrine

Phenylephrine is a selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist of the phenethylamine class used primarily as a decongestant, as an agent to dilate the pupil, to increase blood pressure, and to relieve hemorrhoids. Phenylephrine is marketed as an alternative for the decongestant pseudoephedrine, although clinical trials show phenylephrine, taken orally at the recommended dose, to be no more effective than placebo for allergy relief.[1][2] Phenylephrine can als...
 Oraverse Phentolamaine Mesylate

Phentolamine (Regitine) is a reversible[1] nonselective α-adrenergic antagonist.[2] Contents 1 Mechanism 2 Uses 3 Chemistry 4 Adverse effects 5 References Mechanism Its primary action is vasodilation due to α1 blockade.[3] Non-selective α-blockers can cause a much more pronounced reflex tachycardia than the selective α1 blockers. Like the selective α1 blockers, phentolamine causes a relaxation of systemic vascul...
 Wytensin Guanabenz

Guanabenz (pronounced GWAHN-a-benz, sold under the trade name Wytensin) is an alpha agonist of the alpha-2 adrenergic receptor that is used as an antihypertensive drug. It is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension).[1][2] The most common side effects during guanabenz therapy are dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache and weakness. Guanabenz can make one drowsy or less alert, therefore driving or operating dangerous machinery is not recommended. ...
 Prazosin

Prazosin is a sympatholytic medication that is used to treat high blood pressure, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).[2][3] Prazosin is an α1-blocker that acts as an inverse agonist at alpha-1 adrenergic receptors.[4] These receptors are found on vascular smooth muscle, where they are responsible for the vasoconstrictive action of norepinephrine.[3] They are also found throughout the central nervous system.&am...
 Sotylize Sotalol Hydrochloride

Sotalol is a medication used to treat abnormal heart rhythms. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises that sotalol only be used for serious abnormal heart rhythms, because its prolongation of the QT interval carries a small risk of life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia known as torsade de pointes.[2] Sotalol is a non-selective competitive beta-adrenergic receptor blocker that also exhibits Class III antiarrhythmic properties.[3]&#...
 Nostrilla Oxymetazoline

Oxymetazoline is a selective α1 adrenergic receptor agonist and α2 adrenergic receptor partial agonist. It is a topical decongestant, used in the form of oxymetazoline hydrochloride. It was developed from xylometazoline at E. Merck Darmstadt by Fruhstorfer in 1961.[1] Oxymetazoline is generally available as a nasal spray. Contents 1 Medical uses 2 Side effects and special considerations 2.1 Rebound congestion 2.2 Use in pregnancy 3 Overdose 4 Pharmacology 4.1...
 Nalspan SR Phenylephrine

Phenylephrine is a selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist of the phenethylamine class used primarily as a decongestant, as an agent to dilate the pupil, to increase blood pressure, and to relieve hemorrhoids. Phenylephrine is marketed as an alternative for the decongestant pseudoephedrine, although clinical trials show phenylephrine, taken orally at the recommended dose, to be no more effective than placebo for allergy relief.[1][2] Phenylephrine can als...
 Alfuzosin

Alfuzosin is a medication of the α1 blocker class. It is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).[1] As an antagonist of the α1 adrenergic receptor, it works by relaxing the muscles in the prostate and bladder neck, making it easier to urinate. Alfuzosin was approved by the U.S. FDA for treatment of BPH in June 2003. It is marketed in the United States by Sanofi Aventis under the brand name Uroxatral and elsewhere under the tradenames Xat, Xatral, Prostetro...
 Minipress Prazosin

Prazosin is a sympatholytic medication that is used to treat high blood pressure, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).[2][3] Prazosin is an α1-blocker that acts as an inverse agonist at alpha-1 adrenergic receptors.[4] These receptors are found on vascular smooth muscle, where they are responsible for the vasoconstrictive action of norepinephrine.[3] They are also found throughout the central nervous system.&am...
 Salmeterol

Salmeterol is a long-acting β2 adrenergic receptor agonist (LABA) used in the maintenance and prevention of asthma symptoms and maintenance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms.[1] Symptoms of bronchospasm include shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. It is also used to prevent breathing difficulties during exercise (exercise-induced bronchoconstriction).[2] It is marketed as Serevent in the US.[3]...



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