Big Pharma's Lockdown On Legitimate Chronic Pain Patients
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1425 Replies Updated



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David Says:


Is narcotic pain medicine becoming a thing of the past?

Why are doctors across America phasing out the practice of prescribing effective pain medication?

Will big pharmaceutical companies ever truly understand what it's like to face the other side of the coin?

Lately there's been a musty scent in the air surrounding the use of prescribed narcotic pain medication. Many doctors appear to be running scared as the DEA scours through fields of medical records, inspecting prescribing pads like a mouse scavenges for food in a dimly lit cellar.

Should the day come when doctors recommend Ibuprofen to a feeble man who's been involved in a terrible car accident (breaking several bones / requiring extensive surgery), is this doctor at risk of malpractice when there are more effective options available that they choose not to pick, out of fear? Fear of what? Doing the right thing? No, I don't think this is the reason... Somewhere along the line, in the not too distant past, doctors were loosely prescribing narcotic pain medication as if it would never go out of style. Nowadays, the harsh penalty of potentially losing their license for writing any unknown number of opiate prescriptions over so many calendar days or some other form of strict criteria, has been enough to prevent many physicians from taking even subtle "risks" with patients who are expressing obvious signs of pain and discomfort.

The unfortunately unique problem with pain is that it's not a physical object and in order for others to detect it, they'd have to rely solely on the backbone of our body language using their intuition - something that's gone missing in western practice. If more doctors took the time and really got to know their patients front to back, then they will be their own best judge of deciding what the right thing to do is, regardless of what the DEA thinks about their decision or what their drug representative wants out of the deal. Sadly, until patients are put before profits, the foundation of America's healthcare system remains in jeopardy like an iceberg affected by global warming.

While I believe that the vast majority of human beings in their right mind would choose to do the right thing, we must all work together to become the change we wish to see within every aspect of our lives; and knowing that by doing so, it will shine light on those crossing our path that need it most.

In the meantime, some patients may have to find another way to manage their pain without putting their life or health at risk. Others are turning to natural alternatives such as kratom, cannabis, turmeric and/or implementing various lifestyle changes into their daily regime... But the key is to never give up hope.

What will you do?

Warm regards to all who face life's challenges head on.



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1425
Maryanne Says:
via mobile

I think it has become ridiculous. You are talking about oeople that have maintained control and jobs and a normal life with the help of pain meds. I am sorry. If you want to be a drug addict , nothing is going to stop you. In fact,this crack down will cause legitanate people that have controled their life to go elewhere. And more than likely are older patients. I was married to am alcholic. Hehad evety b.v exciae in the world to drink. Invluding even blaming it jn others. And resenting me bebause I could choos rd to have ccx a xouple of glasses od wine and stop. I had repspinsibilitues as a mother wife hpuse holdmanager and teacher . I have had mugraines since I was two. And learned all sorts methods. However ,>if i wanted to functin go to work to needs of others.i also have had drug addicts on the family. Again, any excuse. Of course i might ha e wanted ti drink mysrof in a stuper or yake my migraine neds to pass outfir the pain and nausea.did i?no.because the wi ri ld does not revolve around me.i am sorry for those thaf feel that need.as far as shmpathu no.bevause there are ao many outkets to get help.
Why should we suffer because others abuse? I am sick of it.andnow the young adults and others feel they have rights and they should not feel bad aboit expecting.
Enough.
Doctors..grow some for your patients that you have had for so long. You know them.do what you are suppse to do.woujd you deny insulin? Well?

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1424
Vintage Lady Says:
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Re: Suzie (# 1409)

Suzie... I have asked my doctor for suboxene or methadone for pain. Said they can't do it because I am NOT a recovering addict! No, they cold turkied me off my Lorcet and Soma. But still have the pain I was free of for over 2 decades. Have not true a psychiatrist, so far I still have Diazpam for acute anxiety.... can't afford to lose that...

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1423
Vintage Lady Says:
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Re: Etech (# 1420)

They have all of these statistics... they know the answers. Quite simply, we pain patients are being forced through hoops to be able to have our pain prescriptions restored to us. Meanwhile they are throwing money to the illegal drug abusers in the form of substitutes that are now being used as recreational, illegal drug use, while we are left out and n the rain with NO SUITABLE UMBRELLA. try Lorcet for over 2 decades job just to be able to put the pain away so I can manage normally, now on Tylenol 3... ha, ha... A responsible government would have had the stop gaps in place to leave legitimate pain patients alone, along with legitimate doctors BEFORE this is WAR ON OPIOIDS began. Then gone after the pill mill doctors and their patients. Nothing is going to change... we will never have our pain medications restored to the level that made our lives bearable. Especially if powers that be continue to let pharmacist override our doctor's prescriptions. There is no fix now... they are trying to put a bandaid on a hemmorage...

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1422
Etech Says:

Re: Etech (# 1420)

I would like to thank the MEDCHAT group for posting this message for it seems very important for all of the users in here. We owe it to you guys.

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1421
Mejane Says:
via mobile

Re: Etech (# 1420)

Excellent info! Thank you! What also MUST be addressed is the drastic change in the formulation ingredients & obvious new compound fillers added &/or deletions from original active/inactive ingredients. As our doses have been slap in the face cut in half, the med we do get is suddenly giving bizarre side effects & lil or no pain relief. I’ve been a legit CP patient for 20 yrs no issues, able to lead a tolerable living existence. Prior to pain mgmt I was in a wheelchair. Sadly now looks like I’m heading back to one because of this CPP VICTIMIZATION!

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1420
Etech Says:

OK all of you pain people, now is your time to shine. Time to list your aliments: Here is a copy paste on the FDA drug safety risk management to give your input on.

UPDATED MEETING TIME AND OPEN PUBLIC HEARING TIME: June 11-12, 2019 Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee

UPDATED INFORMATION (as of June 6, 2019):

The meeting time has been changed for the June 11-12, 2019 joint meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee. On June 12, 2019, the meeting time has changed from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. to 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Additionally, the Open Public Hearing time has changed from 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. to 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. All other information remains the same.

PLEASE READ THIS BECAUSE IT WILL DETERMINE HOW LITTLE OR BIG THE OPIATES ARE PRESCRIBED.. HERE IS THE LINK BECAUSE THE AGENDA IS PROBABLY TOO LONG TO ENTER IN THIS MESSAGE. IF THE LINK DOESN'T HIGHLIGHT, PLEASE TRY TO COPY IT INTO THE ADDRESS BOX. I MIGHT TRY TO FIT THE AGENDA IN THIS POST. BUT FIRST HERE IS THE LINK:

https:/­/­www.fda.gov/­advisory-committees/­advisory-committee-calendar/­june-11-12-2019-joint-meeting-drug-safety-and-risk-management-advisory-committee-and-anesthetic-and#event-information

HERE IS THE AGENDA AS FOLLOWS:

FDA is seeking public input on the clinical utility and safety concerns associated with the higher range of opioid analgesic dosing (both in terms of higher strength products and higher daily doses) in the outpatient setting. FDA is interested in better understanding current clinical use and situations that may warrant use of higher doses of opioid analgesics. We are also interested in discussing the magnitude and frequency of harms associated with higher doses of opioid analgesics relative to lower doses, as well as optimal strategies for managing these risks while ensuring access to appropriate pain management for patients.

FDA frequently hears from patients and healthcare providers that higher dose opioid analgesics continue to be a unique and necessary part of effective pain management for some patients. FDA is also cognizant of serious safety concerns associated with both higher strengths and higher daily doses of opioid analgesics, both in patients and in others who may access these drugs. Higher strength products may be more harmful in cases of accidental exposure and overdose and may also be more sought out for misuse and abuse. Along with a number of other factors, a higher daily opioid dose is associated with greater risk of overdose. Concerns have also been raised that higher dose opioid regimens may carry a higher risk of addiction, although robust evidence for a causal relationship is lacking. There is a strong association between higher opioid dose and duration/persistence of opioid analgesic therapy and assessing temporal relationships and independent effects of opioid dose and duration on the risks of both addiction and overdose is challenging. In addition, FDA acknowledges the complex and evolving landscape of the opioid epidemic, with myriad Federal, State, local, and payer efforts to encourage more judicious prescribing of opioid analgesics, and the growing threat of highly lethal illicit opioids.

To better understand both the clinical utility and harms of higher dose opioid analgesics in the current environment, and to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various potential risk management strategies, FDA brings these issues to an advisory committee to seek input and advice from the clinical, patient, public health, and research communities.

In particular, FDA seeks to discuss: (1) The current clinical use and situations that may warrant pain management with opioid analgesics at higher product strengths and daily doses, factors influencing prescribing practices, and specific patient populations for whom there may be utility in prescribing these medications at higher doses; (2) the magnitude and frequency of harms associated with opioid analgesics at higher product strengths and daily doses, relative to lower strengths and daily doses, including the role of opioid dose in adverse health outcomes in both patients and in others who may access the drugs (e.g., risk for developing addiction, fatal overdose), the relevance of therapy duration and physical opioid dependence, and risks in different subpopulations (e.g., patients with chronic non-cancer pain, young children, adolescents); and (3) possible FDA interventions and their expected impact on patients and public health more broadly, including, for example, potential effects on prescribing and pain management practices, patient experience and behaviors, and adverse outcomes such as addiction and overdose.

HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO SUBMIT YOUR COMMENTS ELECTRONICALLY...PLEASE READ

Electronic Submissions
Submit electronic comments in the following way:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Comments submitted electronically, including attachments, to www.regulations.gov will be posted to the docket unchanged. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for ensuring that your comment does not include any confidential information that you or a third party may not wish to be posted, such as medical information, your or anyone else’s Social Security number, or confidential business information, such as a manufacturing process. Please note that if you include your name, contact information, or other information that identifies you in the body of your comments, that information will be posted on www.regulations.gov.

IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO COMMENT ELECTRONICALLY READ BELOW BUT THERE ARE MORE INSTRUCTIONS. PLEASE COPY AND PASTE THE LINK FROM ABOVE .

If you want to submit a comment with confidential information that you do not wish to be made available to the public, submit the comment as a written/paper submission and in the manner detailed (see "Written/Paper Submissions" and "Instructions").

PLEASE GET ON THERE AND VOICE YOUR OPINION. YOU WANT OPIATES?

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1419
Mejane Says:
via mobile

Re: LauraThe pain docto (# 1418)

There is hope for us!! The Pain Management Task Force is working on our behalf. FED HHS (Dr. Singh) is addressing Congress & CDC. Thanks to our advocate Ed Coughlan (National Pain Report) read his update via link below...

http:/­/­nationalpainreport.com/­pain-task-force-report-is-out-hhs-working-to-give-it-oxygen-8839970.html

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1418
LauraThe pain docto Says:

Re: Jon Andeerson MD (# 1408)

WOW the pain management doctor I am going to(we really should not call these people pain management) said to me "Well you do not have cancer". So he won't help me. I wondered if I could do anything about that? Does anyone know?

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1417
Vintage Lady Says:
via mobile

Re: LauraThe pain docto (# 1414)

I altered the pain that is constant 24/7... oh yeah makes it so much easier to care for my 86 yr old Mom at 62. I have to live for her and myself, and take care of her like an autistic child. She has at least 50 lbs on me... and though I have height, my weight is not anywhere near what it should be. Can't even wear a size 00. And not by choice. I was at least 115 consistently when I was taking my good prescription for pain... even worked the floors an associate at Goodwill in Gainesville, FL while baking orbit pain. After the husband and I separated in 2008, pain pills started going away... life is not even hardly a little fun anymore because it hurts too much. Pain level generally around a 5 on GOOD days... please back off the legitimate opioid pain patients... Listen to us... PLEASE!

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1416
Vintage Lady Says:
via mobile

Re: LauraThe pain docto (# 1414)

Amen... I am getting my Medical Marijuana Card soon. It will be amazing after all these years to finally have at least that much goings-on in our state. However, it is by no means a replacement for the Lorcet I used to be prescribed for over 2 decades for Chronic Acute Pain, and Some for Insomnla with muscle spasms, # 30, one each night at bedtime. In the first place, being on SS, the cost is not really feasible. The dispensaries, from what I heard, is more expensive than black market. At least I will have the card to keeo from being made a festival for trying to find alternatives our doctors, big pharmaceuticals, and our government take EVERYTHING AWAY FROM yUS, COLD TURKIED THEIR PATIENTS OFF THEIR PAIN MEDS. NO Subpoena, Subtext and Methadone to "help" users quit lthe illegal recreational drug abusers/users thru humanely detoxing them. Where was our "help" for the legal pain patients? No where... we got thrown under the bus to 'protect', ourselves from the issue with opioids and druggies!!! For Shame Legitimate Doctors... you Don't write scrips from guidelines even... easier to stay off government's radar as care properly for the sma patients in the same way you always have... but you still get the same amount of money by doing so, so why care. "I Will Do No Harm... etc... remember that pledge... you are NOT practicing that. Stand up for yourselves and your patients... if you still really care about us!!!

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1415
Mejane Says:
via mobile

Re: Wanda (# 1407)

I hear you & mutually feel your pain. I, too, after exhausting every single surgery/procedure following a near-fatal car accident, finally diagnosed with “Failed back/neck Syndrome, spinal stenosis, Arachnoiditis (crawling scar tissue thru spine attacking nerve endings, Fibromyalgia...” etc, too much to list I was wheelchaired until referred by top doc professionals to the world of Managed Opiate Pain Mgmt 25 yrs ago. A full blown miracle...out of the wheelchair, managed tolerable pain ie; A LIFELINE! Now at no fault to us, our lifeline is being taken away. They are neglecting to understand why & how the opiate is prescribed LEGALLY LEGITIMATELY! Good news is we are finally being recognized! Let’s hope we don’t have to suffer much longer. Google research the NIH & the NATIONAL PAIN REPORT; Ed Coughlan!

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1414
LauraThe pain docto Says:

Re: Goat c (# 3)

Boy do I ever agree with the black market stuff, if the feds think they are doing something good WAIT a lot of bad is coming. Because people are going to get desperate, pain will either kill you sooner, cause you to be bed bound and all that follows. People will get desperate and go to lengths they have never done before. I have seen elderly people who live good Christian life's do exactly that. I heard someone on the news say that even going to the dentist is very painful these days and the feds need to look at us who do not abuse drugs not lump us all into the same group.

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1413
LauraThe pain docto Says:

I AM IN THE SAME BOAT. I have never abused any drug and out of no where I get oh we can not give you any help. I ended up in the hospital because of the withdrawal symptoms, they did nothing to help me through it(the doctors that were giving me them) the hospital put me back on everything and could not believe how cold these doctors are. All I keep hearing is we can't. This article was an eye opener. My husband found a family doctor that gives him what he needs. I have serious health problems and will have them the rest of my life. I have heart disease and the pain is either going to cause me to have a heart attack or stroke. The pain doctors want the heart doctor to do something about my serious high blood pressure caused by pain, he can't. No one wants to help and boy every doctor I have seen has been out right rude. I see others getting help so I knew it was just the doctors having no balls. They say no one can help. Yes I have gained weight also, all I can do is lay in bed. Today I seen a neurosurgeon because the pain management doctor said I needed surgery, the doctor asked me how I felt before (when I was on the pain management drugs) and did I ever think about surgery. No was my answer and he agreed and said we need to send you to a better pain management place, surgery should always be a last resort for spine problems because he said you will have to have other surgeries in the future so we need to delay that until I can not take it anymore. He is sending me somewhere else but only time will tell. My pain is extreme everyday I miss having a life. These doctor's would never suffer like this, maybe they need to. I knew they could help me but as the article said they just do not want to deal with the dea. Now I have to spend a lot of money to get some relief. I am on ssi very low income. Street drugs are going to skyrocket and screw the medical marijuana I have always hated it.

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1412
Margo Says:
via mobile

Re: Dee (# 1400)

If she is off of narcotics there is no way that they are going to start her up again. My pain management doctor who I have been seeing for 11 years I am very afraid that when I see him the end of May that he is going to take away everything that he has given me and I am dreading the day that I go there. another doctor within the same practice did that to my son and I mean literally totally dropped him took away all his meds and he had to go through three weeks of withdrawal here at home while I took care of him it is not fun is hard to do and if the doctors knew what they were doing they would be so ashamed of themselves and unfortunately I know this is bad but I do wish that they would be in the same position as myself and my son.

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1411
Dee Says:
via mobile

Re: C (# 1401)

I went to the site and signed, then I shared. Thanks!

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1410
batty1 Says:

Hi
After I lost my thyroid to cancer and inability of endocrinologist to properly medicate my hormone issue I developed Psoriatic Arthritis in my joints and tendons on both legs so at the ripe old age of 49 which is really 99 because that's how old I feel and how bad my pains are I actually walk with a cane ... the real sadness is prior to my thyroidectomy I was fit and healthy, now I'm crippled and fat and Doctors are too stupid to help. I don't want heavy pain meds. I want doctors to think outside the box ...each persons health needs don't fall into a pretty little package.

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1409
Suzie Says:

I've found a loophole and it is called Suboxone. I won't go into my chronic pain conditions but I am 70 years old and have several conditions that in the past any one of them would have qualified for prescription pain medication. And my doctor is ok with me spending the time I have left suffering every day because it hurts just to move. I remember when quality of life used to be something doctors were concerned with but now the fear of losing their license comes before that. Anyway, Suboxone (I take generic) is wonderful for pain and I feel my life has been handed back to me and I'm so grateful. I was ready to pretend to be a heroin addict if I had to but I found a psychiatrist who is so compassionate that I didn't have to pretend and am getting it for pain and not addiction. And with this drug a little goes a long way and more isn't necessarily better. I take 2 milligrams twice a day and 90% of my pain is gone but the best part is the chronic diarrhea I have due to two bowel re-section surgeries is completely gone and I have normal bowel movements for the first time in over 20 years. That condition was truly debilitating as I had to not eat for 24 hours if I had to leave the house for an appointment or even to grocery shop.

So as you can see this is a wonder drug for me and I like it much better than any pain medication mostly because of the long half-life I don't feel like I'm on anything because when it's time to take the next dose it hasn't worn off yet so there is no ups and downs which I love. While I am truly sorry for the people dying of overdose I feel it is ridiculous to make people (especially seniors) with legitimate needs for pain medication suffer. Luckily this drug has been overlooked and while I don't particularly want to bring attention to this, I feel I should try to help others in my situation.

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1408
Jon Andeerson MD Says:

Re: "...Should the day come when doctors recommend Ibuprofen to a feeble man who's been involved in a terrible car accident (breaking several bones / requiring extensive surgery), is this doctor at risk of malpractice when there are more effective options available that they choose not to pick, out of fear? Fear of what? Doing the right thing? No, I don't think this is the reason..."

I suggest that day has arrived: It was a few years ago that I sustained a fall resulting in 5 (five) contiguous rib fractures and the consequential pain of such an event. I was offered the good advice of entering the Surg ICU for observation, which I declined (fearful of nosocomial infection).

My Internest 'attending' recommended Acetaminophen, saying directly to me, an elderly retired Anesthesiologist, that, and I quote: "I only give narcotics to patients who are dying of cancer ".

Yes, an astonishing, inappropriate, and unethical decision on his part.

So, to answer you, "yes, that time came, years ago, and not limited to my own case."

Beyond unethical, I decided that his act was, in fact, criminal... criminal negligence...

Opinions are welcome...

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1407
Wanda Says:
via mobile

All I can say is I've had severe chronic pain for the last 21 years! I have a 3ft, stack of medical records to prove it. I'm not a pill popper but I desperately need something to help with the pain as was stated Drs are backing off from giving out pain meds to those who legitimately need it. I do NOT abuse it I only take it when the pain gets so bad and nothing else works!! I've tried ibuprofen but it helped not at all. I didn't ask for the things that happened to me that causes this pain to happen but there's nothing I can do about it. I just feel it's NOT right for the people that TRUELY and legitimately need it not to be able to get it from our Drs when they also know how desperately that I need it, it's not our fault that ppl go get it and abuse it!!!

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1406
jobird Says:

Re: Chonano (# 1403)

Thank you your post.Until people have unending bone pain(both knees) there will be no understanding of what a person lives with 24/7.I have Tramadol 25 mg. Which I do not abuse.These people are painting everyone with a broad paint brush.

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